Sahasralinga, Sirsi, A place in western ghats, Karnataka known for Shiv Linga

Friday February 24th, 2012 in India, Places to Visit | Be the first to Comment »

 

Sahasralinga, Sirsi, A place in western ghats, Karnataka known for Shiv Linga

Sahasralinga, Sirsi, A place in western ghats, Karnataka (Picture :Jinu John)


 
 

* Sahasralinga word is a mixture of 2 words Sahastra which means thousand (1000) and Linga representing Shiv linga.

* Sahasralinga, a very significant place in Uttara Kannada also known as North Canara or North Kanara comes under the district ‘Sirsi’, the southern Indian State of Karnataka.

* This place is around 10km from the town center.

* The significance of this place lies in the fact that the river flowing through the city gives you a beautiful view to watch numerous sculptures inside it.

* It is on the bank of river Shalmala. The river is surrounded by lush green forests.

* The place is quite secluded, except during “Maha Shivratri” celebrations when it receives a sizeable number of pilgrims from the surrounding areas.

* As per history, all these shiva lingas were built by Sadashivaraya, king of Sirsi (1678-1718).

* You can found various figures been build over it like Basava/bulls (carved in front of the shivalingas), saints, people doing puja and archana, Lord of Snakes etc.

* The stream is full of thousands of Shivlinga of different sizes and shapes scattered all around.

* This aspect of the place makes it a cool place to chill out for both pilgrims and nature lovers.

 
 
Reference Link : Know Your Destination


Shravati river, Western Karnataka, India

 

Shravati river, Western Karnataka, India (Picture : Copyright plsssnraju)

Shravati river, Western Karnataka, India (Picture : Copyright plsssnraju)


 
 
* It originates and flows entirely within the state of Karnataka in India.

* It is one of the few westward flowing rivers of India and a major part of the river basin lies in the Western Ghats.

* The famous Jog Falls are formed by this river.

* The river itself and the region around it are rich in biodiversity and are home to many rare species of flora and fauna.

* It originates at a place called Ambutheertha in the Thirthahalli taluk of Shimoga district.

* According to a legend of the times of Ramayana, this is the place where the Hindu God Rama broke a bow to win the hand of Sita.

* Total length of the river is around 128 km (80 mi) and it joins the Arabian Sea at Honnavar near Uttara Kannada district.

* The major tributaries of the river are Nandihole, Haridravathi, Mavinahole, Hilkunji, Yennehole, Hurlihole, and Nagodihole.

* With a major part of the river lying in the Western Ghats, the Sharavathi river basin receives a large amount of rainfall.
 
 
Reference Link : Know Your Destination


Sahasralinga, Sirsi, A place in western ghats known for Shiv Linga

Monday October 17th, 2011 in Festivals, India, Myth, Places to Visit | 1 Comment »

Sahasralinga word is a mixture of 2 words Sahastra which means thousand (1000) and Linga representing Shiv linga.

Sahasralinga, a very significant place in Uttara Kannada also known as North Canara or North Kanara comes under the district ‘Sirsi’, the southern Indian State of Karnataka. This place is around 10km from the town centre.The significance of this place lies in the fact that the river flowing through the city gives you a beautiful view to watch numerous sculptures inside it.

It is on the bank of river Shalmala. The river is surrounded by lush green forests.The place is quite secluded, except during “Maha Shivratri” celebrations when it receives a sizeable number of pilgrims from the surrounding areas.

As per history, all these shiva lingas were built by Sadashivaraya,king of Sirsi (1678-1718). You can found various figures been build over it like Basava/bulls (carved in front of the shivalingas), saints, people doing puja and archana, Lord of Snakes etc. The stream is full of thousands of Shivlinga of different sizes and shapes scattered all around. This aspect of the place makes it a cool place to chill out for both pilgrims and nature lovers.

 

Although you will not find any hotel or food shop near around, but still this place is one of the favourite tourists spot who prefer bringing in their own packed food.

 

Best way to reach the destination

Jeeps are the best mode of transport here. Hire a jeep from Sirsi for around 20km to this place.

 

Other Near by Places :

There are more then 20 seasonal waterfall near around like Kumbri falls, Shivganga falls etc and places like Benne Hole.

 

Photo Courtesy : Jinu John


Coorg-Scotland of India

Sunday May 23rd, 2010 in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Before I start with the details, here’s a friendly word of warning: this scenic beauty has the power to haunt you for the rest of your life. You can never get enough of it.

A bright blue sky, lush green valleys, misty mountains, lovely orange groves, happy-go-lucky people, full of life and much more. The land where all your coffee comes from. That’s Coorg for you!

Situated on the Western Ghats of Karnataka in South India, Coorg is any nature lover’s paradise. If you are the type who loves to mingle with nature, romance in the mountains or open your arms wide and feel the cool breeze (like I did) that seems to tingle you, then Coorg is just the place for you! There’s a lot in store for the more adventurous types too-trekking, golfing, angling-make your choice! Religious trips abound for the Hindus and Buddhists. But what strikes you most here is the breathtaking view.

Madikeri, the district headquarters of Coorg can be reached only by the road and trust me there can be no better way. It is 260 kms from Bangalore and you can take your pick from the regular buses plying or hire a private cab like I and a group of friends did. You wouldn’t want to miss the splendid lush green countryside.

We reached Madikeri late in the evening and were dumbstruck to see our place of stay. It was literally in the lap of nature! Acres and acres of coffee plantations, majestic mountains all around and our beautiful sanctuary, bang in the centre. We wouldn’t have asked for anything better. I could feel the light breeze on my face and its calmness in my veins. Since it was getting dark and the road journey got a little tiring, we decided to set out early next morning.

Although, Madikeri is pleasant all year round, the nights can get a little chilly. But the answer to this is a bonfire which most places of stay arrange for their guests. And we had our delicious dinner around one. A warm fire and an authentic spicy meal-double whammy I would say. Coorg offers some of the most mouthwatering delicacies. The recipes are very different. There is abundance use of coconut, curry leaves, chilli and spices like cardamom and pepper. That’s another thing Coorg is famous for apart from the aromatic coffee and honey.

Two days in hand and (we had just the weekend…this was one of those trips planned in a spur of the moment…a quick packing of bags and let’s go!) we had a lot to see and a lot to do. So we decided it was best to start early in the morning. After breakfast and a steaming kullad (earthen mug) of coffee, we set out to explore the land.

Attractions: Day one and we had the Madikeri Fort, Tala-kaveri, Abbey Falls and Raja’s Seat on our list of places to look out for.

There it was, in the centre of Madikeri, a 19th century fort and as John Bunyan may have said, “the name of which was Beautiful.” The Madikeri Fort houses a temple, a chapel, a prison and a small museum. It offers a beautiful view of Madikeri.

Next, we moved on to Tala-kaveri which is considered the birth place of the sacred river Kaveri. One look at the astoundingly beautiful place and all clashes over the river seem futile. There is a kund like structure from which the river emerges in the form of a small perennial spring, flows underground and again emerges a short distance away. There is a shrine near the kund and a big tank in front of it where a lot of devotees bathe before offering their prayers. From the Tala-kaveri, we took the steps leading up to the Brahmagiri Peak. The view of the misty blue Brahmagiri hills from the peak was something I couldn’t take my eyes off from. I could have stood there forever but that would not be doing justice to Coorg which has so much more to offer. So for then, I knew the best I could do was to capture the beauty through my best friend-my digital camera-and I went click click click. Thanks to technology!

Third on our list was the famous Abbey Falls. We were told that it is not only a famous attraction for tourists but also for the film industry. Well, it didn’t seem to be that captivating a sight for me, but you could go there and keep guessing as to which actress, clad in a white sari has danced under this waterfall on the silver screen. But the sounds at play were interesting. The roar of the falls could be heard from the main road and the chirping of birds was easier heard than seen. We got an instant picture clicked from a photographer with the Abbey falls in the background and well, picture perfect it was. So I guess it was worth a visit.

As the day was coming to a close and the sun was about to set, it was time for us to preside on Raja’s Seat. Don’t mistake it to be a chair or a couch, for it is not. Legend goes that the Kings of Coorg spent their evenings here watching the sunset (hence the name). Indeed, the view of the sunset here is spectacular. No wonder, you find a lot of people thronging the place (also a busy couple or two). I took an ice-cream and presided on my royal seat to enjoy the sunset.

The sun had set and we decided to have a look at the local market. After all, no holiday is complete without shopping. So, we parked our cab and decided to walk. That is the best way to explore. You find a lot of tourists and localites on the streets even after it gets dark. So its quite safe. We picked up the famous aromatic coffee for our family back home and also the delicately flavoured Coorg honey as remembrance.

After an authentic Coorg dinner at one of the local restaurants, we got back to our cottage. Our ‘perfect hosts’ had already prepared a bonfire and we chatted with some nice coffee in hand. Having discussed the next day’s plan of action, we went off to sleep. It had been a long but exciting day.

Day two started with coffee and breakfast in bed (it can’t get better than this). The morning was a little lazy for my friends. So while they were in bed reading, I decided to go out and have a look at the coffee plantations and the orchards. Wrapped in a shawl, I walked amidst the coffee plantation. The slight chill and the sunrays falling on you, the feeling is beyond words. You need to experience it for yourself.

Our destination for the second day was the Nagarhole National Park. If you are an animal lover like me, then you surely cannot leave Coorg without paying a visit to this picturesque park which is also the country’s first ‘bio-sphere reserve’. The first thing that catches your eye here is the snake like river flowing through the park (hence the name Nagarhole). You can be sure of seeing the elephant, spotted deer, sambhar, peacock and many other birds. We were lucky to catch a glimpse of the awe-inspiring tiger too. There are camps organised for people who want to enjoy the wilderness. You can also opt for a jungle safari on elephant back like we did. There’s a lot to catch here and it can get tiring, so I would suggest that you dedicate one whole day to this place.

The next morning and it was time to bid goodbye to the ravishing beauty that is Coorg. On our way back to Bangalore, we stopped at Kushalnagar, a small town which has the Namdroling Monastery also known as ‘Little Tibet.’ This monastery is home to the jaw droppingly spectacular ‘Golden Temple’. Enter the temple and you cannot ignore the 18 metre high gold plated Buddha. The sound of gongs, drums and chants fills your ears. The atmosphere in the monastery is heartwarming. The village also offers a lot for your hunger and shopping appetite. We simply splurged!

We were ready to head back to Bangalore, back to the humdrum routine of life. It was time to write home about the visit. As Lewis Carroll’s walrus said, “The time has come to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships and sealing wax, of cabbages and kings.”